Langston hughes the negro speaks of rivers analysis. Langston Hughes' History & Summary 2019-01-09

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Poem Analysis of “The Negro Speaks of Rivers” by Langston Hughes

langston hughes the negro speaks of rivers analysis

I heard the singing of the Mississippi when Abe Lincoln went down to New Orleans, and I've seen its muddy bosom turn all golden in the sunset. To many whites it represents prosperity, especially in the time of the Civil War when slave trade was one of the bases of economy. Throughout the poem Hughes uses metaphorical statements to suggest to the reader what the soul of the African American has been through. This is perhaps the more powerful memory, or the more sustaining one, and even if deferred, will reemerge in one form or another. He does not create a mysterious aura about blacks, but leaves that up to the reader.

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The Negro Speaks of Rivers by Langston Hughes: Summary and Analysis

langston hughes the negro speaks of rivers analysis

I was a good boy, Never done no wrong. The latter empties into the Atlantic ocean; the Nile flows northward from Uganda into the Mediterranean; in the United States the Mississippi River flows southeast from north central Minnesota to the Gulf of Mexico. These rivers have been there for always, even before humans were born. Knopf, 1947 Freedom's Plow Musette Publishers, 1943 Shakespeare in Harlem Alfred A. As he goes on, it becomes obvious that he is referring to a legendary idea of knowing, as in he has heard stories of the mighty, ancient rivers. Throughout this poem Hughes has placed many symbols in the readers mind to bring the image of the African American people to thought.

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Poem Analysis of “The Negro Speaks of Rivers” by Langston Hughes

langston hughes the negro speaks of rivers analysis

The themes addressed in this poem have come to be associated with Harlem Renaissance. Hughes has made his poem more understandable by the use of such elements as setting and situation, speaker, tone and diction, images, and symbols. He does not create a mysterious aura about blacks, but leaves that up to the reader. These rivers full of water and mud will last till the dusk of the human civilization, just as they had seen its dawn. However, we experience the uncommonly true fear faced in the 1920s.

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Langston Hughes' History & Summary

langston hughes the negro speaks of rivers analysis

People have equated rivers to the aspects of life - time, love, death, and every other indescribable quality which evokes human life. Hughes shows us that there is more than one way to explain matters. In the fourth line of the poem Hughes speaks of the Euphrates River. Knopf, 1927 The Weary Blues Alfred A. Copyright © 1989 by The University Press of Kentucky. Hughes made it a point not to unveil what he really wanted us to see until he gave us a brief lesson in history.

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Poem Analysis of “The Negro Speaks of Rivers” by Langston Hughes

langston hughes the negro speaks of rivers analysis

Throughout the poem Hughes uses the word? As the rivers deepen over time, the Negro's soul does too; their waters eternally flow, as the black soul suffers. These rivers mean a lot to the Negro since they connect him with his ancestors who lived centuries ago. This simile essentially mixes both of the metaphors into a personal discussion, and now ties the author directly into the mythology of the river; the author has become a part of the myths. Hughes embraced blues music because it expressed the worries of the common man in a simple and direct manner. George Hutchinson Hughes had come to Whitman by way of such Midwestern rebels as Carl Sandburg prior to the twenties. DuBois, it is a sonorous evocation of transcendent essences so ancient as to appear timeless, predating human existence, longer than human memory.

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The Negro Speaks of Rivers by Langston Hughes summary

langston hughes the negro speaks of rivers analysis

To thoroughly understand the point that Hughes is making, one must take an enhanced inspection at certain elements that Hughes uses throughout the poem. Hughes has tried multiple times to reconnect with his father, but it never succeeded. Finally, he writes about the muddy and golden Mississippi, which he links American slavery and Abraham Lincoln. Both genres of music express themes of deep pain, although blues songs often address a lost or wayward lover. Authors in the twentieth century expressed their stance on the battle between cultural heritage and American assimilation.

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The Negro Speaks of Rivers by Langston Hughes summary

langston hughes the negro speaks of rivers analysis

He witnessed the creation of these structures, which are amongst man's greatest feats of architecture. While these ideas did not originate with him, he embodied them in verse of such fluency and power that it seems undated half a century later. He looked at the Nile and watched the pyramids rise nearby; he heard the muddy Mississippi sing when Abraham Lincoln traveled to New Orleans. Blues songs feature heavy repetition, and singers often seem to be laughing and crying at the same time. These ancient rivers in the poem are like veins and roots, because they provide the nurturing sustenance that supports life.


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The Negro Speaks of Rivers by Langston Hughes: Summary and Analysis

langston hughes the negro speaks of rivers analysis

To thoroughly understand the point that Hughes is making, one must take an enhanced inspection at certain elements that Hughes uses throughout the poem. The sense of beauty and death, of hope and despair, fused in his imagination. My soul has grown deep like the rivers. To many African Americans this river may represent the oppression of their people. James Mercer Langston Hughes was born February 1, 1902, in Joplin, Missouri.

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